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Addle-Pates, Gudgeons and Paper-sculls: Fools in the Regency Era — 22 Comments

  1. I enjoyed this and recognized a few. I already knew 10 on the first list and 2 on the second. It’s fun to learn about language differences as well as cultural ones. Thank you so very much for this fun and informative posts as well as the links. I’ll check them out later.

  2. “His garret, or upper story is empty, or unfurnished” kind of like the modern “his elevator doesn’t reach the top floor”. Love it. I’m a word nerd so I love these kinds of posts! Thanks for sharing.

  3. Thanks Maria grace!
    It is always a good day when one can increase ones vocabulary with much needed words! These are much more colorful than the one I normally use ( I’ll let you guess the word)

    Fun to read for sure!

    • I rather like ‘He was rocked in a stone kitchen’ and ‘he is no burner of navigable rivers’ myself. Thanks Carol.

    • That does feel pretty appropriate, doesn’t it? Siblings are siblings, no matter what century they’re in.

  4. noticed that Pig-widgeon is on there, which was what Ginny named Ron’s owl in the harry potter books… I’m guessing that Rowling did that deliberately…since the owl is a bit excitable and had been said to be “not reliable”?

    • I hadn’t noticed that! Good point though. I’m pretty sure it was deliberate, something that fitting rarely is accidental. Thanks for pointing it out! I love little tidbits like that.

  5. I found the terms Ben and Benish interesting as my son’s name is Ben. 🙂 Do they have specific meanings or just generally mean fool?

    • All I found was the general meaning of fool/foolish. But remember that was street slang. Ben/Benjamin was a fairly common name of the era.

      • He thoroughly enjoyed learning about these words…huge smile and that twinkle in the eye that he always gets when he finds something amusing. 🙂

  6. Pingback: A Little Colorful Language: Marriage and Weddings - Random Bits of Fascination

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