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Jane in January – Pride and Prejudice Illustrators – Jane Odiwe — 43 Comments

  1. I love illustrated editions of anything I read, Jane, not just Austen or Austenesque writing. Thanks for putting this piece together for us all, it’s a fascinating look back at the history of P&P illustrating. I wonder what an edition would look like today illustrated by a modern artist? Have you ever fancied taking on that task yourself?

    Of the three editions of P&P that I own, my favourite has to be my most recent acquisition, which features quite a lot of Hugh Thomson’s work. It’s probably the nearest I’ll come to a “Peacock” of my own. I’d have to win the lottery to make that particular dream come true, I think!

    • I would love to do a whole P&P, but sadly, Angie, I really don’t have the skills to do it, though it’s very kind of you to suggest I have! Hugh Thomson was a wonderful illustrator-I hope you get your ‘Peacock’ one day!

  2. I love this post and find the illustrations so fascinating, Jane. I do not own an illustrated edition of any of her books, but my mother does. It’s not one of these, but now I’m curious and will have to ask her who illustrated her P&P copy. 😉

  3. I love the overview and sampling of the different illustrators of Pride and Prejudice. I have a reprint of the Peacock Edition and believe it is as close as I will get to an authentic edition. Thank you for sharing. This has given me a greater appreciation of the illustrated editions.

  4. I would love to win the prize from C. Allyn Pearson – a classic hardcover edition of “Persuasion”! (But all of the prizes are wonderful!)
    I live in the United States. Email: smhparent [at] hotmail [dot] com

  5. Great article! I love the illustrated books too Jane, and my Peacock is also my prize possession. I particularly love the illustrations at the start of every chapter. Some of the later ones leave a little to be desired but they are always a talking point. Lex de Renault (Collins 1933) made both Darcy and particularly Bingley most unattractive and Maximilien Vox (NA Dent 1934) produced some interesting but sometimes strange illustrations. Edgard Cirlin World Publishing 1947) produced quite grotesque images! My favourite more modern illustrator of P&P is Lynette Hemmant (1980 World Works). I posted a couple of pictures of hers on the on the FB link. The one of Lizzy and the Gardiners approaching Pemberley has the house looking so like Lyme Park but this was drawn 15 years before the series!

    • Yes, I think it makes you appreciate how wonderful the artists I featured are, doesn’t it, Hazel? It’s a real skill being able to capture a character in an illustration. Thank you for your comments and I loved the FB pictures!

  6. I truly enjoyed looking at the illustrations here and viewing the video. I do not own any illustrated versions and now I buy mostly Kindle versions so have no illustrations in those purchases. What is the name of the kindle illustrated version? I would be interested in looking at that and maybe procuring such. My daughter had a peacock themed wedding so I was drawn to that book. It is just beautiful. Thank you for sharing.

  7. I have a small collection of vintage P&P. I saw the beautiful peacock edition on Ebay a few years ago, but the opening bid they wanted was over my head. I did contemplate for a few seconds there before I let it go, but it was so exquisite that I was almost willing to give up paying the mortgage in order to acquire it. LOL! To this day would love to have owned it.

  8. Rae, I was lucky – my copy was not very expensive-I can’t believe how much they are now! You might be interested in the link I gave Sheila above!

  9. If a picture was truly worth 1,000 words, then these serve to enhance our appreciation for the works of Jane Austen. I am with many of the other commenters who do not have an illustrated version. This does not mean that I do not want one though. Thank you so much, Jane, for sharing this. Your selections show your eye for art and design. Great post!!!

  10. Thank you Jane for this informative post of a number of illustrators of Jane Austen’s works. I have been on the look out for an illustrated book through auctions here in Canada. I did see an illustration of Hugh’s on a UK auction site from a different book other than Jane’s. I didn’t bid on it but I’m sure it would have been more than I was able to afford! I’m hopeful that one day I will own one. Thank you for the link you gave Sheila. I will check it out!

    • Ebay is a great site for a bargain, and occasionally affordable ones do come up, though sadly they seem to be more and more expensive.

  11. I love seeing these pictures. Thanks Jane for sharing! I can’t pick just one illustration that I enjoy the most because they are all nice.
    I used to have a pretty paperback copy of P&P with a peacock on the cover that reminds me of the first one in the post…not sure where it went!

  12. I have enjoyed the illustrations I have of P&P, but never appreciated them before your write up. Thank you so much,

    I now have identified the ones I have in 2 separate hard cover volumes, each a compilation of Miss Austen’s books, but by different publishers. They both have Hugh Thomson’s drawings in them, or at least I identified a signature at the bottom of most of the drawings(all black & white) that looks like “HT”, one published by Gramercy Books and the other published by Ann Arbor Media Group.

    Also I have an e-book of P &P I had gotten on Amazon a few months ago for only a couple of dollars, and it’s published by Top Five Books, 2013. It has color drawings by both Brock brothers in it, 24 of which are by CE Brock and 12 by H M Brock.

    I am now so excited about my collection. Thanks so much for sharing this about the artists!

  13. THANK YOU for scanning these images! I’ve never seen most of these – only the Brock drawings, which are classic to me. Robert Ball’s works look wonderful, and now I will have to search for more of his work.

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